Configuration file of Panda3D

All Panda3D programs read their configuration options from a central configuration file: /etc/Config.prc

You can view this file to see what values are assigned to the various configuration variables that is used by any Panda3D program. A list of the possible configuration variables, their description and default values is here. With superuser permissions, this configuration file can be edited to change the parameters used by Panda3D programs.

Tried with: Panda3D 1.9 and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

Ctags configuration file

If you find yourself using certain parameters frequently with ctags, you may want to put them in a ctags configuration file. That way, ctags will read and use them every time it is invoked. Typically, the name of the configuration file is .ctags and it is placed in the home directory.

Place configurations and parameters, just like you would specify to the ctags program, one per line, in this file. That’s it! 🙂

Note: As your ctags file grows, you might like to add comments to it. However, currently there is no support for adding comments. A feature request for this can be seen here.

Tried with: Exuberant Ctags 5.9 and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

How to enable any extension in Mercurial

Mercurial ships with many extensions, but none of them is enabled by default. In addition, many other extensions can be downloaded for Mercurial.

If the extension is already present, it can be enabled by editing your Mercurial configuration file.

For example, to enable an extension named Foo, edit your Mercurial configuration file to add these lines:

[extensions]
Foo =

If the extensions section already exists with an enabled extension, additional extensions can be enabled by adding a line each.

For example, to additionally enable a Bar extension:

[extensions]
Foo =
Bar =

Tried with: Mercurial 2.0.2 and Ubuntu 12.04.1 LTS

Mercurial configuration files on Linux

On Linux, there are three types of configuration files read by Mercurial: local (to a particular repository), per-user and per-system. When a configuration setting appears in more than one of these files, the local overrides per-user which overrides per-system.

The local configuration file is named hgrc and lies in the .hg subdirectory of the repository.

The per-user configuration file has to be named .hgrc and placed in $HOME directory.

The per-system configuration file has to be named hgrc and placed in the /etc/mercurial directory.

There are a few other per-system configuration options that are more complicated: .rc files in the installation directory or the /etc/mercurial directory.

More information about configuration file names and paths can be found using:

$ hg help config

Tried with: Mercurial 2.0.2

Mercurial configuration files on Windows

On Windows, there are three types of configuration files read by Mercurial: local (to a particular repository), per-user and per-system. When a configuration setting appears in more than one of these files, the local overrides per-user which overrides per-system.

The local configuration file is named hgrc and is found in the .hg subdirectory of the repository.

The per-user configuration file can be named either .hgrc or Mercurial.ini. It can be placed either in %USERPROFILE% or %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH% directory.

The per-system configuration file has to be named Mercurial.ini. It can be in the installation directory of Mercurial.

There are a couple of other per-system configuration options that are more complicated: .rc files in the installation directory or using the registry.

More information about configuration file names and paths can be found using:

$ hg help config

Tried with: Mercurial 2.3.2