Code Yarns ‍👨‍💻
Tech BlogPersonal Blog

My guide to Anki

📅 2018-Sep-16 ⬩ ✍️ Ashwin Nanjappa ⬩ 📚 Archive

Memory has been shown to be fundamental to our thinking and understanding. It is impossible and pointless to remember everything we learn or discover. But there is some information that we clearly see the value in remembering. Our brain does move some information from short-term memory to long-term memory based on repeated use in the near past. However, not everything we want to is placed in long-term memory. I recently read Michael Nielsen's essay on augmenting long-term memory, that described the concept of spaced repetition and the use of Anki as a tool to achieve this. I highly recommend reading this essay if this topic sounds interesting to you.

I had used Anki a few times in the past. I was confused by its concepts, UI and usage and did not get any benefit from it. After reading Nielsen's essay, I started to actively use Anki again and this time I am seeing some benefits. This is a very short guide to using Anki based on solely on my usage.

To summarize: make your flashcards atomic, keep a single deck, revise once a day, use phone app to revise, desktop app to create cards and AnkiWeb to sync the cards.